CarMax Inc. has scored a six-peat, named for the sixth year in a row as the Top Workplace in the region among mega-sized employers in the Richmond Times-Dispatch’s annual workplace recognition program.

The top award was announced at the Top Workplaces ceremony held Thursday evening in the ballroom of the Altria Theater in Richmond. About 500 people attended.

Sixty-five businesses in the Richmond region were named for having the best workplaces. Four of those companies were ranked No. 1 in each of the four size categories — mega, large, midsize and small. In addition to CarMax, the top winners were Long & Foster, Hourigan and RVA Restoration.

Goochland County-based CarMax, which has about 1,531 local employees, has taken the top spot in the mega-size category every year in the Top Workplaces program for companies with more than 1,000 employees.

The auto chain is the only business to receive the top award all six years in any category.

Craig Cronheim, CarMax’s vice president of human resources and asset protection, accepted the award on the company’s behalf.

“When I joined CarMax, we were less than half the size that we are now. You often hear that as companies grow rapidly and transform themselves, they change or weaken their culture. That is not happening at CarMax. Our culture is growing stronger. It’s growing deeper and more diverse,” Cronheim said.

CarMax, the nation’s largest auto retailer, has more than 200 auto stores and 24,000 employees nationwide.

The company has two stores in the Richmond area, as well as a digital and technology innovation center along the Canal Walk in downtown Richmond. This summer, CarMax will expand its downtown Richmond presence when it leases space in the Canal Crossing building to house its product and marketing departments.

The Top Workplaces rankings are based on data collected and analyzed by Energage, a Pennsylvania-based human resources technology and employee research firm.

Awards are based on confidential employee surveys.

The other top winners in the company size categories are:

  • Long & Foster real estate’s Richmond division, winner in the large company category in which eight businesses with 400 to 999 employees were honored;
  • Hourigan, a construction and development company, winner in the midsize category in which 23 companies with 125 to 399 employees were honored; and
  • RVA Restoration, winner in the small category in which 30 companies with 124 or fewer workers were honored.

It was RVA Restoration’s first time being named a Top Workplace. The company of 36 employees repairs and restores buildings after catastrophic events such as fires and storm damage and also does renovations.

Patrick Burke, director of sales at RVA Restoration, accepted the award for RVA Restoration owner Jeremy Ford, who was not at Thursday’s ceremony.

“It’s the people, our owner, Jeremy Ford, his passion for doing the right thing for our customers and employees” that makes the company a great place to work, Burke said.

Burke said he left a job at a large insurance company to work for RVA Restoration.

“I left them to work with Jeremy because I saw an opportunity to help people. I’m part of a much smaller company but a bigger part of it.”

The Top Workplaces program also honored four individuals for their leadership in their businesses, with awards given to one individual in each business size category:

  • Richard D. “Rich” Fairbank was honored for his leadership at Capital One Financial Corp. in the mega-size category;
  • Buddy Omohundro was honored for his leadership at Apex Systems LLC in the large company category;
  • Liza Borches was honored for her leadership at Carter Myers Automotive in the midsize company category; and
  • L. Page Ewell III was honored for his leadership at Richmond Window Corp. in the small company category.

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