Title: cultural studio director, principal and co-owner at Richmond-based Glavè & Holmes Architecture

Born: 1970 in Indiana

Education: University of Oregon, master of architecture and master’s in historic preservation, 1997; Clemson University, bachelor’s in design, 1992

Career: director of design, Chip Webster & Associates, 1997-2009; cultural studio director, Glavè & Holmes Architecture, 2009-present

In which part of the metro area do you live: Powhatan County

Best business decision: “Moving to Richmond has vastly increased my impact and opportunity to work on some of our most important historic and cultural sites. In the last decade, since joining Glavè & Holmes Architecture, our firm has been entrusted to work on more than half a dozen National Historic Landmark properties and some of Virginia’s most prominent museums.

Mistake you learned the most from: “Early in my career, I signed off on a roof sample for a historic building that I thought the owner had approved, only to find out the owner disliked the color. We had to do a lot of negotiation to get that one fixed. Always check, double-check and verify the decisions. Good quality control is really important.”

First job after college: “Out of graduate school, I spent 12 years working as an architect on the island of Nantucket. I worked with a few buildings there dating back to the 1700s, and it gave me a real appreciation for how good craftsmanship can transcend time.”

If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently: “That’s a tough one. I have loved all the places I have been in my career. Architecture is a profession of endless possibilities, so I feel like the opportunities are only limited by my need to sleep every once in a while.”

Book that inspired you the most: “Farthest North,” by Fridtjof Nansen. “If you don’t know who this man is, you should look him up. You can do absolutely anything in this world, if you set your mind to it and trust your instincts and experience.”

Favorite/least favorite subject in school: Favorite: history; least favorite: biology.

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