10:20 p.m.

E.W. Jackson, a minister and attorney from Chesapeake, is the Republican nominee for lieutenant governor.

Pete Snyder, a technology entrepreneur from Northern Virginia, has withdrawn, capping an epic nomination battle at the Richmond Coliseum.

Ken Cuccinelli, the nominee for governor will head a ticket with strong tea party ties that also includes Sen. Mark D. Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg, the nominee for attorney general.

9:50 p.m.

 

Corey Stewart, chairman of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors, threw his support to E.W. Jackson and joined the Chesapeake minister in a lap around the Coliseum floor.

The move came amid signs of skulduggery late in the game. Ken Cuccinelli, Mark D. Obenshain and Stewart all knocked down false reports that they were backing Jackson's rival, Northern Virginia technology entrepreneur Pete Snyder.

9 p.m.

Chris LaCivita, a top aide to the Cuccinelli campaign, clarified on Twitter that the Republican nominee for governor will not endorse Pete Snyder or E.W. Jackson as they battle for the lieutenant govenor nomination.

Sen. Mark D. Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg, the GOP nominee for attorney general, tweeted that he has not endorsed Snyder. Fliers on the convention floor indicating an endorsement were fake, he said.

On the third ballot, Jackson was just short of victory. He had 5,934 votes, for 49.7 percent of the tally.

Snyder had 3,652 votes, for 30.6 percent.

Corey A. Stewart, chairman of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors was knocked out after he finished third, with 2,350 votes -- 19.7 percent.

8:20 p.m.
 
The Republican nomination battle for lieutenant governor appears headed to a fourth ballot, with Northern Virginia technology entrepreneur Pete Snyder trying to catch minister and attorney E.W. Jackson of Chesapeake.
 
Snyder appears to be gaining momentum, adding endorsements from tea party favorite Jamie Radtke and the Virginia chapter of the NRA in what has the trappings of a stop-Jackson movement.
 
The tally remained unclear as delegates awaited the final results from a third round of balloting at the Richmond Coliseum.
 
Jackson's supporters are passing out a lengthy statement in which he defends himself as a candidate of substance, not merely style.
 
"I have been accused of being no more than a speechmaker," Jackson says in the statement. "In fact I have been an entrepreneur and a risk-taker, willing to pioneer and break new ground."
 
Jackson indicates in the statement that opponents are attacking him over past financial setbacks.
 
"These attacks are what some career politicians call 'hardball' Jackson writes. "I call it 'small ball.' In any event, I refuse to play ball in that demeaning game."
 
He adds: "These attacks are happening because we are winning hearts and minds."
 
7:25 p.m.
 
Chesapeake minister and lawyer E.W. Jackson retained a commanding lead as the three remaining candidates headed to a third ballot seeking the party's lieutenant governor nomination.
 
On the second ballot, Jackson received 4,558 votes, to 2,066 for technology entrepreneur Pete Snyder and 2,000 for Corey A. Stewart, chairman of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors.
 
The candidates dropped after the second ballot were Susan B. Stimpson, chairman of the Stafford County Board of Supervisors, with 1,871 votes and Del. L. Scott Lingamfelter, R-Prince William, with 1,441 votes.
 
Lingamfelter has endorsed Snyder. Jamie Radtke, a Stimpson backer who once headed the Virginia Tea Party Patriots, also has switched to Snyder.
 
Stimpson is not endorsing a candidate at this stage.
 
Radtke and Jackson were among the U.S. Senate candidates who lost the party's 2012 nomination to George Allen.


6:45 p.m.

The balloting for the Virginia GOP's lieutenant governor nomination is heading to a third ballot with Chesapeake minister and attorney E.W. Jackson still solidly in first place.
 
Del. L. Scott Lingamfelter, R-Prince William and Susan B. Stimpson, chairman of the Stafford County Board of Supervisors, are out of the running.
 
Lingamfelter has just endorsed technology entrepreneur Pete Snyder. He and Corey Stewart, chairman of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors, are Jackson's remaining rivals on the third ballot.
 
In his statement endorsing Snyder, Lingamfelter wrote:
 
"2013 is a vital year for us in the Commonwealth and we must nominate a Lt. Governor who can help bring our ticket to victory. Jobs and the economy are the number one issue that face the Commonwealth. Pete Snyder has been a job creator and successful businessman who will prove to be an able partner to Ken Cuccinelli in focusing Virginia on economic growth and prosperity. For that reason, I endorse Pete Snyder for Lt Governor and wish him and Burson my very best wishes in the campaign months ahead."
Jackson's supporters have started a conga line on the floor of the Richmond Coliseum.
 
Supporters of various campaigns are talking to one another, perhaps caucusing about endorsements.
 
5:20 p.m.

After the first ballot for the lieutenant governor nomination Chesapeake minister and attorney E.W. Jackson has a commanding early lead with more than 31 percent of the vote.
 
At this stage Jackson has more than twice as many votes as his closest rival.
 
His four remaining rivals are closely bunched. Susan B. Stimpson, chairman of the Stafford County Board of Supervisors, is second, followed by Corey A. Stewart, chairman of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors; technology entrepreneur Pete Snyder and Del. L. Scott Lingamfelter, R-Prince William.
 
A candidate must have more than 50 percent of the delegates' votes to be nominated, so the balloting will continue for the lieutenant governor nomination.
 
Jackson, a tea party favorite who sought the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate last year, would be the first black Republican nominated for statewide office since Maurice Dawkins faced Sen. Charles S. Robb, D-Va., in 1988.
 
Here is the tally on the first ballot. These tallies are rounded and do not include vote fractions.

Jackson 3732
 
Stimpson 1798
 
Stewart 1769
 
Snyder 1739
 
Lingamfelter 1375
 
Davis 862
 
Martin 662

Davis and Martin were eliminated on the first ballot. Two additional candidates will drop after the second ballot.
 

4:55 p.m.
 
Sen. Stephen H. Martin, R-Chesterfield and former state legislator Jeannemarie Devolites Davis are out of the running for the GOP's lieutenant governor nomination.
 
The contest heads to a second ballot with five candidates still in contention: Chesapeake minister and attorney E.W. Jackson; Corey A. Stewart, chairman of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors; Susan B. Stimpson, chairman of the Stafford County Board of Supervisors; technology entrepreneur Pete Snyder and Del. Scott Lingamfelter, R-Prince William.
 
 A candidate must have more than 50 percent of the delegates' votes to be nominated, so the balloting will continue for the lieutenant governor nomination.
 
 
4:30 p.m.
 
Sen. Mark D. Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg has defeated Del. Robert B. Bell, R-Albemarle on the first ballot to become the Republican nominee for attorney general.

"This is a great victory and we are gonna take this campaign all across Virginia," Obenshain said.
 
"We have a great message of individual liberty and personal responsibility. It is a mainstream message. We need to make Virginia more attractive for visitors and create more private sector jobs.
 
"We'll be going in areas where Republicans don't usually go and we are going to win this election from top to bottom. As your candidate, I am going to take this message all over the commonwealth and I will meet forget that once I am elected, I will work for the great diverse people of Virginia.
 
"We all have a stake in this thing called liberty. It takes all of us to stand shoulder to shoulder in this great campaign."
 
 
3:19 p.m.
 
Nearly two hours in, the Virginia GOP is still tallying the first ballot results in the contests for the attorney general and lieutenant governor nominations.

1:30 p.m.

Balloting for the lieutenant governor and attorney general nominations is under way at the Richmond Coliseum.

There are seven GOP candidates for lieutenant governor and two for attorney general.

A total of 8,094 delegates are eligible to vote -- but that is not the number of votes.

In the party's complex voting rules, one vote can be apportioned among as many as five delegates.

The voting strength of a city or county's delegation at the GOP convention depends on how strongly the locality has backed Republican candidates in recent elections.

1:12 p.m.

The Republican candidates for attorney general are now taking turns addressing delegates at the Richmond Coliseum.

Del. Robert B. Bell, R-Albemarle, is up first, to be followed by Sen. Mark D. Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg.

Bell says Republicans have a "moral obligation to take our constitution back."

Obenshain addresses President Barack Obama: "Mr. President, the next time you have the IRS target the Virginia Tea Party, you're gonna have to deal with me."

Cuccinelli, a delegate to the convention, plans to back Obenshain.

After the attorney general candidates speak, balloting will commence for the two down-ticket offices.

12:30 p.m.

The seven candidates for the GOP lieutenant governor nomination are taking turns addressing the delegates at the Richmond Coliseum.

Former Rep. Allan West, R-Florida, introduced Del. L. Scott Lingamfelter, R-Prince William.

West, as a young captain commanding a divisional rocket battery at Fort Riley, Kan., served under Lingamfelter, who was his commanding officer.

Oliver L. North introduced entrepreneur Pete Snyder. North had not set foot in the Coliseum since 1994, when he became the Republican nominee who took on Sen. Charles S. Robb, D-Va.

 Corey Stewart, chairman of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors, said he's been labeled "a racist and bigot," over the county's tough immigration ordinance, "but I did not back down."

E.W. Jackson of Chesapeake, a minister and attorney, told the crowd: "I'm no African-American, I'm an American!"

Sen. Stephen H. Martin, R-Chesterfield, said: "The Constitution is a contract between government and citizens, and we respect that contract."

Susan Stimpson, chairman of the Stafford County Board of Supervisors, criticized Virginia Republicans who backed the tax increases in Gov. Bob McDonnell's transportation plan.

11:48 a.m.

Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli formally took control of Virginia's Republican ticket this morning with a speech that sounded familiar conservative themes of limited government and regulation while slamming his Democratic rival Terry McAuliffe.

Cuccinelli, addressing thousands of delegates at the Richmond Coliseum, termed McAuliffe an inside-the- Beltway opportunist who is not prepared or committed to run the commonwealth.

The Republican also struck back at critics who would label him an extremist.
 
"My opponent and his liberal cronies will say I’m too conservative. Well, that can’t be true, otherwise the IRS obviously would’ve audited me" Cuccinelli said, referring to IRS targeting of tea party groups.

11:26 a.m.

Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli addresses the crowd and receives a standing ovation after he accepts the Republican nomination for governor. The crowd also cheers enthusiastically when he says that he was the first in the nation to challenge the Affordable Care Act in a federal court.

11:13 a.m.

Teiro Cuccinelli speaks about her husband Ken, says that his decision to run for governor was not an easy one.

11:08 a.m.

A Ken Cuccinelli ad plays on jumbo screens and sets the tone for the candidate’s speech.
 
10:58 a.m.

 Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal criticizes Terry McAuliffe, the Democratic nominee for governor:

“Terry McAuliffe has got people scared. It’s not Republicans in Virginia who are scared but Democrats in Washington. His big-government liberalism is enough to disqualify him from being the governor of this great state of Virginia. Terry McAufliffe cannot be trusted. He is all talk and no and no action. He just doesn’t tell the truth.”

Jindal tells the crowd: “I got some bad news. Just by being here, every one of you has just signed up for an audit by the IRS and your phone records will be seized.”

10:46 a.m.

With thousands saying “aye,” Virginia Republicans formally nominate Ken Cuccinelli  for governor.

Cuccinelli actually has been the party's nominee since Jan. 14.  He was the only Republican who submitted signatures by the party's filing deadline.

 10:17 a.m.

Pat Mullins, chairman of the Virginia GOP, blasts the Richmond Coliseum:

“They said they would have 12 doors open. Right now, only four doors are open. There are still 5,000 people outside, we are not starting until everyone is in.”

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4:20 p.m.

Sen. Mark D. Obenshain is the Republican nominee for attorney general, defeating Del. Robert B. Bell, R-Albemarle on the first ballot.

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