A Hanover County man and avowed Ku Klux Klan leader charged with driving through a crowd at a Black Lives Matter protest in Henrico County was denied bond by a Henrico Circuit Court judge on Thursday morning.

Harry H. Rogers, 36, was initially charged with attempted malicious wounding, felony vandalism and assault and battery in connection with the June 7 incident.

During the hearing on Thursday, Circuit Judge John Marshall said there are no restrictions he could put in place to ensure that Rogers won’t “get behind the wheel” again.

“By his actions in this case, he shows he is an unreasonable danger to the public,” Marshall said.

On Thursday, Henrico Commonwealth’s Attorney Shannon Taylor brought additional charges against Rogers, including four counts of assault with hate crimes, two counts of felonious attempted malicious wounding and one count of felony hit and run.

Video footage and photos shown during the hearing Thursday show Rogers driving onto the median to pass a group of cars behind an estimated 300 protesters headed north on Lakeside Avenue near Vale Street. From there, footage shows Rogers’ driving into at least two bicyclists and one demonstrator on foot.

No one was seriously injured in the incident.

At one point, photos and witnesses interviewed during the investigation indicate Rogers exited his car to assume what Chief Deputy Commonwealth Attorney’s Michael Huberman called a “Western-movie type of posturing” with a loaded pistol holstered at his side.

After his arrest, the Henrico County Police Department recovered an AR-15 firearm from Rogers’ vehicle and two 30-round M4 magazines in his center console.

Rogers’ attorney, George Townsend, argued during the hearing that there was not probable cause that Rogers would miss his next court date or endanger the community if he were to be released. Townsend played a two-second video of the June 7 incident, which showed Rogers’ vehicle coming into contact with two cyclists.

Townsend argued that the cyclist to Rogers’ right stepped toward Rogers’ car during the collision. The initial three charges stem from the contact between that cyclist and Rogers’ vehicle.

In response, Huberman detailed Rogers’ criminal history since 2007, which includes various misdemeanor charges from different Virginia counties.

He pointed out that Rogers had several opportunities to turn left to exit the crowd. Rogers had “no reason to be there other than to intimidate and scare and disrupt an organized Black Lives Matter rally,” Huberman said.

Releasing Rogers, Huberman argued, would put the community at risk.

“He is a danger to the community — he has access to a firearm, he has access to an organized hate group,” Huberman said.

In its investigation, Henrico police interviewed 25 direct witnesses and obtained and executed a search warrant at the home Rogers’ shared with his girlfriend, where they found several firearms and KKK memorabilia.

After his arrest, Rogers told police he was “the highest-ranking member” of the Ku Klux Klan in Virginia.

Police also found that Rogers had attended the August 2017 white supremacist Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville, during which Heather Heyer, a counter-protester to the rally, was killed after a white nationalist rammed his car into a group of counter-protesters. Rogers later protested at Heyer’s funeral.

A police report from May 29 of this year details an incident during which Rogers entered a medical facility in eastern Henrico without a face mask. When the receptionist asked him to put on a face covering, Rogers went back to his car and returned in a Klan hood.

When he was escorted out by staff, he reportedly yelled “white power.”

In the days prior to his June 7 arrest, Rogers engaged in Facebook post using racial epithets, at one point commenting “Black lives splatter.”

Rogers’ commitment to white supremacist ideologies was what led Taylor to pursue assault with hate crime charges, which carry a minimum sentence of six months.

“We are aiming to ensure that the citizens know that this behavior will not be tolerated — that the hatred we believe to be part of the intent of these crimes will not be tolerated in Henrico County,” Taylor said after the hearing.

Henrico police are still seeking to identify the second cyclist that Rogers hit.

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