Registration of guns

called act of tyranny

Editor Times-Dispatch:

In Virginia, there are 340 county and city law enforcement agencies. They employ approximately 23,000 officers and deputies who tirelessly work to keep the public safe. Virginia employs around 2,200 state troopers who diligently seek to maintain order on the busy interstates of the commonwealth. We also have our National Guard, made up of about 7,500 citizens ready to serve our state at a moment's notice.

These roughly 34,000 people have taken the personal responsibility to maintain and defend the constitutions of both Virginia and the United States. I offer my most sincere appreciation and gratitude for their selfless service.

In contrast, of our 8.5 million residents, an estimated 30% — or 2.5 million — law-abiding people own firearms.

This is precisely the founders' intent.

Alexander Hamilton wrote in The Federalist Papers No. 29,

“If circumstances should at any time oblige the government to form an army of any magnitude that army can never be formidable to the liberties of the people while there is a large body of citizens, little, if at all, inferior to them in discipline and the use of arms, who stand ready to defend their own rights and those of their fellow-citizens. This appears to me the only substitute that can be devised for a standing army, and the best possible security against it, if it should exist.”

The defense of citizens' rights against a tyrannical government is the entire purpose of the Second Amendment.

Do the governor and his party actually presume to tell Virginians what firearms they can own? What possible reason could any government have for suddenly ordering the registration of any privately owned firearm, unless seizure is the ultimate objective?

When in Virginia, of all states, Democrats choose to act so boldly against the very core of American freedoms, it is indeed an act of tyranny and a national disgrace.

M.L. Tuckwiller.

Doswell.

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