Athletic trainers across the country are changing their routines and joining the fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

The National Athletic Trainers Association put together an app aimed at helping trainers assist understaffed hospitals. The app was intended to give health care providers a database to look for help nationwide. More than 950 athletic trainers have signed up during the past week.

Christina Eyers generally oversees about 40 trainers in her role as a director of athletic training in Detroit’s Henry Ford Health System. Most of them are assisting medical staffs in and around Detroit, recently cited as a potential trouble spot in the pandemic.

“My staff has been very eager,” Eyers said.

They do not provide critical medical care. Instead, Eyers said her organization’s trainers have been screening patients, which typically means checking for symptoms and taking their temperatures. Some have helped in shipping prescriptions.

The assistance has come in handy.

“With the surge of patients we’re seeing, we’re taking an all-hands-on-deck approach,” said Robert Albers, a senior sports medicine physician at Detroit’s Henry Ford Hospital who often works with trainers. “I don’t think it matters what avenue you’re normally in. You have to be ready to help out and step up.’’

Tory Lindley, the president of the NATA, said athletic trainers are accustomed to working with urgency amid chaotic environments. Eyers added they are calm under pressure from their experience dealing with athletes who suffer sudden acute injuries.

“With the skill set that athletic trainers have, the types of needs that our communities have now and the types of needs that hospital systems and pop-up clinics have, the athletic trainer skill set is perfectly suited for,” said Lindley, who also is Northwestern University’s senior associate athletic director for health, safety and performance.

Athletic trainers are health care professionals who are licensed or otherwise regulated to work with athletes and physically active people to prevent, diagnose and treat injuries and other emergency, acute and chronic medical conditions. They’re different from personal trainers, who focus primarily on fitness.

Elsewhere

WNBA: Los Angeles Sparks guard Sydney Wiese is the first WNBA player to test positive for the coronavirus. The third-year player from Phoenix, who starred at Oregon State, announced the result on Twitter. Wiese, 24, said that she is “feeling well — fortunate to only show mild symptoms, but I am capable of spreading it.” Wiese is in Phoenix under self-quarantine. Like many other WNBA players, Wiese spent the offseason playing in Spain, a hotbed for transmission of the coronavirus.

College football: Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and his girlfriend have restarted their efforts to raise money for those affected by the coronavirus.

The two had set up a GoFundMe page earlier this week until told by Clemson compliance officials the site violated NCAA rules against using an athlete’s name, image and likeness for crowd funding. But the NCAA said Tuesday that Lawrence and other athletes could use such sites to raise money in this case.

Lawrence’s girlfriend, Marissa Mowry, is a soccer player at Anderson University, about 15 miles from Clemson’s campus.

NHL: The Colorado Avalanche said a second player has tested positive for the coronavirus. The team said the player is in self-isolation. The unidentified player has become the fourth known NHL player to test positive for the virus. The other two are with Ottawa.

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