special report

PHOTOS: Flooding in Virginia

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Following three days of light to heavy rains, areas around Danville and Roanoke are seeing flooding.

Officials in Danville are bracing for the possibility that the Dan River could flood parts of the city when it crests Friday. 

Meanwhile, the Roanoke River was expected to crest at just above 16 feet early Friday morning — the level considered a major flood.

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John Boyer

John Boyer, the RTD's staff meteorologist

John Boyer is the first staff meteorologist for the Richmond Times-Dispatch. He joined the RTD newsroom in November 2016 after covering severe weather on television in Tulsa, Okla.

As a native of the Roanoke area, the region’s heavy snowstorms started his fascination with Virginia’s changing weather.

Boyer earned his degree in meteorology from North Carolina State University in Raleigh. He is a member of the American Meteorological Society and earned their Certified Broadcast Meteorologist seal in 2012.

Look for his stories in the RTD and on Richmond.com, along with videos and forecast updates for major weather events in our area.

Email him your story ideas and weather tips.

Thursday Weatherline

N.J., Pennsylvania struck by derecho

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